26 February 2008

Island of Plastic Waste Twice the Size of U.S.

Plastic waste floating in the Pacific Ocean is growing at an alarming rate and now covers an area twice the size of the continental United States, scientists have said.

It is a vast area of plastic debris and other flotsam drifting in the northern Pacific Ocean, held there by swirling ocean currents.It is also called the great Pacific garbage patch is now alarming some with its ever-growing size and possible impact on human health.

The "patch" is in fact two massive, linked areas of circulating rubbish, says Dr Marcus Eriksen, research director of the US-based Algalita Marine Research Foundation, founded by Moore.Although the boundaries change, it stretches from about 500 nautical miles off the California coast, across the northern Pacific toward Japan.

"The original idea that people had was that it was an island of plastic garbage that you could almost walk on. It is not quite like that. It is almost like a plastic soup," Dr Eriksen says.

The concentration of floating plastic debris just beneath the ocean's surface is the product of underwater currents, which conspire to bring together all the junk that accumulates in the Pacific Ocean.

The Conscientious Objector
www.news.com.au

2 comments:

Nicky Dieter said...

This is actually fucked.

The location is apart of international waters so the U.S. officially will not act on the manner in any way.

While sure the garbage isn't all from the U.S., we do have the ability to help. Unfortunately our current government’s idea of humanitarian-ship is waging endless wars, spreading dirty Democracy, and conspiring in acts of mass-murder and media manipulation that even Pol-Pot would be jealous of.

Heather said...

Yes, reuse your water bottles instead of buying a new smart water everyday.

Almost half of the garbage you throw out every day is recyclable.

Fuck the Chicago blue bag system. Urge Mayor Daley to stop spending city money on planting flowers and instead create a recycling system that works. If NYC can have a city-wide recycling agenda, Chicago can too.